Men will often try to protect themselves from women’s anger by trying to minimize it or make it go away. We do that because we’re scared of it, because it triggers us, because it brings up our fear and our shame. But it almost always sends the message that we don’t think that women’s anger is valid or reasonable. For most men, it takes a lot of practice to be able to hold space for women’s anger without getting lost in our reactions, especially since many of us were never taught the skills of emotional self-regulation and shame resilience. But when we try to make women’s feelings disappear, we make things worse. When we learn how to listen to them with fierce compassion instead of defensiveness, we make things better. Dr. Charlie Glickman, on refusing to be one of “the good men” (via cleispress)

(via ducaz)

marjoleinhoekendijk:

☽♡☾ Pagan, Viking, Nature and Tolkien things ☽♡☾

marjoleinhoekendijk:

☽♡☾ Pagan, Viking, Nature and Tolkien things ☽♡☾

(via folkforestwitch)

5centsapound:

People are mobilizing under the hashtag #BringBackOurGirls to pressure the government to do more to find 234 teenage girls kidnapped by jihadist group Boko Haram.

#BringBackOurGirls: Nigerians Demand Release of 200 Abducted Girls

A few weeks ago, armed men abducted the girls, who are between 15 and 18 years old, from the Government Girls Secondary School in Chibok, about 130 kilometres west of Maiduguri in northeast Nigeria. Some have reportedly been forced into marriage with their abductors.

The angst over the horrid abduction and the seeming lack of firm commitment to secure their release has resulted in citizen action. Twitter users are mobilizing and tweeting in support of the protests across the nation, using the hashtag #BringBackOurGirls.

Amnesty International

Petition in solidarity via change.org

In Nigeria, over 200 girls were recently abducted from their boarding school by a terrorist group, Boko Haram, that may be selling them as brides for $12 each. I am calling on the Nigerian government to save them.

This is part of an ongoing conflict within Nigeria that has nothing to do with these 200 girls. The abducted young girls are being affected by a conflict they did not create, and their voices need to be heard. I can only imagine what these 200 girls have been through, and their government is not doing nearly enough to save them.

The group Boko Haram has repeatedly said girls should not be educated. I am a young Nigerian woman pursuing my education in Germany. I believe the Nigerian government must do more to ensure the safe return of these girls.

By signing this petition we declare our solidarity with the kidnapped girls and call upon the world not to forget them, support all efforts to ensure their safe return, and ask President Goodluck Jonathan and the Nigerian Government to ensure all schools are safe places to learn, protected from attack.

(via euphoric-wanderer)

windypoplarsroom:

Norman Lindsay
"This Shrine"

windypoplarsroom:

Norman Lindsay

"This Shrine"

(via themagicfarawayttree)